notemapez

“You will become way less concerned with what other people think of you when you realize how seldom they do.”
― David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest
Our government has kept us in a perpetual state of fear — kept us in a continuous stampede of patriotic fervor – with the cry of grave national emergency. Always there has been some terrible evil at home or some monstrous foreign power that was going to gobble us up if we did not blindly rally behind it by furnishing the exorbitant funds demanded. 

– General Douglas MacArthur, 1957

Our government has kept us in a perpetual state of fear — kept us in a continuous stampede of patriotic fervor – with the cry of grave national emergency. Always there has been some terrible evil at home or some monstrous foreign power that was going to gobble us up if we did not blindly rally behind it by furnishing the exorbitant funds demanded.

– General Douglas MacArthur, 1957

Best beach camping podcast ever!

Best beach camping podcast ever!

I supported Senator Barbara Boxer’s lone dissenting vote back then (yeah, I’m braggin’ about it) knowing that she was right to question and vote against AMFU, and that some day history would vindicate her. I recall most vividly that I almost got my ass kicked in an Albuquerque restaurant when I questioned my country’s patriotic fervor after 9-11 a little too loudly. Those were scary times. Poor Boxer was  practically crucified for questioning the decision to give the President and all future Presidents unlimited war powers in the war on terror. She saw the dangerous precedent it would set and her fears have materialized beyond what any of us could have imagined-the NSA and drone warfare, to name a few.
Boxer was recently vindicated on Radio Lab’s broadcast, Sixty Words, and now in the Atlantic. There will be more to come.
This woman’s courage is the stuff of legend. She will be remembered long after her spineless senate colleges are dead and forgotten. 
She will forever be my hero.
http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/09/the-vindication-of-barbara-lee/380084/

I supported Senator Barbara Boxer’s lone dissenting vote back then (yeah, I’m braggin’ about it) knowing that she was right to question and vote against AMFU, and that some day history would vindicate her. I recall most vividly that I almost got my ass kicked in an Albuquerque restaurant when I questioned my country’s patriotic fervor after 9-11 a little too loudly. Those were scary times. Poor Boxer was practically crucified for questioning the decision to give the President and all future Presidents unlimited war powers in the war on terror. She saw the dangerous precedent it would set and her fears have materialized beyond what any of us could have imagined-the NSA and drone warfare, to name a few.
Boxer was recently vindicated on Radio Lab’s broadcast, Sixty Words, and now in the Atlantic. There will be more to come.
This woman’s courage is the stuff of legend. She will be remembered long after her spineless senate colleges are dead and forgotten.
She will forever be my hero.
http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/09/the-vindication-of-barbara-lee/380084/

Artwork by Anthony Freda, check out his website, this guy has some very cool art!
Morning Read
Resistance is Futile: The Violent Cost of Challenging the American Police State
By John W. Whitehead 
The Rutherford Institute 
A few excerpts from Whitehead’s piece. Check out the full article at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/violent-cops-rule/

If you don’t want to get probed, poked, pinched, tasered, tackled, searched, seized, stripped, manhandled, arrested, shot, or killed, don’t say, do or even suggest anything that even hints of noncompliance. This is the new “thin blue line” over which you must not cross in interactions with police if you want to walk away with your life and freedoms intact.

Frankly, it doesn’t matter whether it’s a casual “show your ID” request on a boardwalk, a stop-and-frisk search on a city street, or a traffic stop for speeding or just to check your insurance: if you feel like you can’t walk away from a police encounter of your own volition—and more often than not you can’t, especially when you’re being confronted by someone armed to the hilt with all manner of militarized weaponry and gear—then for all intents and purposes, you’re under arrest from the moment a cop stops you.

That raises the question, what exactly constitutes resisting an arrest? What about those other trumped up “contempt of cop” charges such as interference, disorderly conduct, obstruction, and failure to obey a police order that get trotted out anytime a citizen engages in behavior the police perceive as disrespectful or “insufficiently deferential to their authority”? Do Americans really have any recourse at all when it comes to obeying an order from a police officer, even if it’s just to ask a question or assert one’s rights, or should we just “surrender quietly”?

The short answer is that anything short of compliance will get you arrested and jailed. The long answer is a little more complicated, convoluted and full of legal jargon and dissonance among the courts, but the conclusion is still the same: anything short of compliance is being perceived as “threatening” behavior or resistance to be met by police with extreme force resulting in injury, arrest or death for the resistor.

The key word, of course, is comply meaning to obey, submit or conform. This is what author Kristian Williams describes as the dual myths of heroism and danger: “The overblown image of police heroism, and the ‘obsession’ with officer safety, do not only serve to justify police violence after the fact; by providing such justification, they legitimize violence, and thus make it more likely.”

If daring to question, challenge or even hesitate when a cop issues an order can get you charged with resisting arrest or disorderly conduct, you’re not the master in a master-servant relationship. In fact, you’re not even the servant—you’re the slave.

This is not freedom. This is not even a life.

Artwork by Anthony Freda, check out his website, this guy has some very cool art!
Morning Read
Resistance is Futile: The Violent Cost of Challenging the American Police State
By John W. Whitehead
The Rutherford Institute
A few excerpts from Whitehead’s piece. Check out the full article at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/violent-cops-rule/

If you don’t want to get probed, poked, pinched, tasered, tackled, searched, seized, stripped, manhandled, arrested, shot, or killed, don’t say, do or even suggest anything that even hints of noncompliance. This is the new “thin blue line” over which you must not cross in interactions with police if you want to walk away with your life and freedoms intact.

Frankly, it doesn’t matter whether it’s a casual “show your ID” request on a boardwalk, a stop-and-frisk search on a city street, or a traffic stop for speeding or just to check your insurance: if you feel like you can’t walk away from a police encounter of your own volition—and more often than not you can’t, especially when you’re being confronted by someone armed to the hilt with all manner of militarized weaponry and gear—then for all intents and purposes, you’re under arrest from the moment a cop stops you.

That raises the question, what exactly constitutes resisting an arrest? What about those other trumped up “contempt of cop” charges such as interference, disorderly conduct, obstruction, and failure to obey a police order that get trotted out anytime a citizen engages in behavior the police perceive as disrespectful or “insufficiently deferential to their authority”? Do Americans really have any recourse at all when it comes to obeying an order from a police officer, even if it’s just to ask a question or assert one’s rights, or should we just “surrender quietly”?

The short answer is that anything short of compliance will get you arrested and jailed. The long answer is a little more complicated, convoluted and full of legal jargon and dissonance among the courts, but the conclusion is still the same: anything short of compliance is being perceived as “threatening” behavior or resistance to be met by police with extreme force resulting in injury, arrest or death for the resistor.

The key word, of course, is comply meaning to obey, submit or conform. This is what author Kristian Williams describes as the dual myths of heroism and danger: “The overblown image of police heroism, and the ‘obsession’ with officer safety, do not only serve to justify police violence after the fact; by providing such justification, they legitimize violence, and thus make it more likely.”

If daring to question, challenge or even hesitate when a cop issues an order can get you charged with resisting arrest or disorderly conduct, you’re not the master in a master-servant relationship. In fact, you’re not even the servant—you’re the slave.

This is not freedom. This is not even a life.

Trailer for Take Me To The River
Old school Memphis soul meets Snoop and contemporary hip hop and rap.

I fucking love New York City Fashion Week!
No seriously, I do.

The real burning man-Zozobra!

Seventy-four years before before Burning Man, my home town, Albuquerque, aka, affectionately known as Burque was burning shit down. Meet Zozobra, or old man gloom. This year marks the 90th anniversary of the burning of Zozobra. I’ve only been to one of these, way back in the early eighties, but I swear I saw this last guy back then. I think we shared bottle in the parking lot.

nvm-illustration:

Honda Mini Moto -  I just wanted to try and draw something accurate for a change, something mechanical.
Sorry it’s not flower or sexy type things.


Damn Holmes, my girlfriend in ninth grade had one of these! After I broke up with her, the sound of a two stroke used make me all jittery and sweat a lot.

nvm-illustration:

Honda Mini Moto -  I just wanted to try and draw something accurate for a change, something mechanical.

Sorry it’s not flower or sexy type things.

Damn Holmes, my girlfriend in ninth grade had one of these! After I broke up with her, the sound of a two stroke used make me all jittery and sweat a lot.

Starting to think about camping season. Time to start tying flies and organizing kit.

New art: nine sardines
Actually two lino cuts reprinted by hand on a single sheet of paper. The results of a demo lesson for my printmaking class. 
I just noticed that one sardine seems happy and the other appears to be a little grumpy. Not my intent, but it works.

New art: nine sardines
Actually two lino cuts reprinted by hand on a single sheet of paper. The results of a demo lesson for my printmaking class.
I just noticed that one sardine seems happy and the other appears to be a little grumpy. Not my intent, but it works.

This works on so many levels.

This works on so many levels.

Interesting, it seems that innocent people are actually fearful of some sort of retaliation for openly discussing/questioning government surveillance on social media. This reads like some sort of dystopian narrative.

Interesting, it seems that innocent people are actually fearful of some sort of retaliation for openly discussing/questioning government surveillance on social media. This reads like some sort of dystopian narrative.